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December 12, 2018

Theresa J Morris, Senior SPJ Member


AOO Club
Associates

 

Seek Truth and
Report It

Ethical journalism should be accurate and fair. Journalists should be honest and courageous in gathering, reporting and interpreting information.

Journalists should:

– Take responsibility for the accuracy of their work. Verify information before releasing it. Use original sources whenever possible. 

– Remember that neither speed nor format excuses inaccuracy. 

– Provide context. Take special care not to misrepresent or oversimplify in promoting, previewing or summarizing a story. 

– Gather, update and correct information throughout the life of a news story. 

– Be cautious when making promises, but keep the promises they make. 

– Identify sources clearly. The public is entitled to as much information as possible to judge the reliability and motivations of sources. 

– Consider sources’ motives before promising anonymity. Reserve anonymity for sources who may face danger, retribution or other harm, and have information that cannot be obtained elsewhere. Explain why anonymity was granted. 

– Diligently seek subjects of news coverage to allow them to respond to criticism or allegations of wrongdoing. 

– Avoid undercover or other surreptitious methods of gathering information unless traditional, open methods will not yield information vital to the public. 

– Be vigilant and courageous about holding those with power accountable. Give voice to the voiceless. 

– Support the open and civil exchange of views, even views they find repugnant. 

– Recognize a special obligation to serve as watchdogs over public affairs and government. Seek to ensure that the public’s business is conducted in the open, and that public records are open to all. 

– Provide access to source material when it is relevant and appropriate. 

– Boldly tell the story of the diversity and magnitude of the human experience. Seek sources whose voices we seldom hear. 

– Avoid stereotyping. Journalists should examine the ways their values and experiences may shape their reporting. 

– Label advocacy and commentary. 

– Never deliberately distort facts or context, including visual information. Clearly label illustrations and re-enactments. 

– Never plagiarize. Always attribute. 

their use in its practice by all people in all media.

 

Home > About SPJ > Our Mission

Our Mission

The Society of Professional Journalists is dedicated to the perpetuation of a free press as the cornerstone of our nation and our liberty.

To ensure that the concept of self-government outlined by the U.S. Constitution remains a reality into future centuries, the American people must be well informed in order to make decisions regarding their lives, and their local and national communities.

It is the role of journalists to provide this information in an accurate, comprehensive, timely and understandable manner.

It is the mission of the Society of Professional Journalists:

— To promote this flow of information.
— To maintain constant vigilance in protection of the First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and of the press.
— To stimulate high standards and ethical behavior in the practice of journalism.
— To foster excellence among journalists.
— To inspire successive generations of talented individuals to become dedicated journalists.
— To encourage diversity in journalism.
— To be the pre-eminent, broad-based membership organization for journalists.
— To encourage a climate in which journalism can be practiced freely.

<a class=”twitter-timeline” href=”https://twitter.com/spj_tweets?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw”>Tweets by spj_tweets</a> <script async src=”https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js” charset=”utf-8″></script>

The SPJ Code of Ethics is a statement of abiding principles supported by explanations and position papers that address changing journalistic practices. It is not a set of rules, rather a guide that encourages all who engage in journalism to take responsibility for the information they provide, regardless of medium. The code should be read as a whole; individual principles should not be taken out of context. It is not, nor can it be under the First Amendment, legally enforceable.

For an expanded explanation, please follow this link.

Supporting documents

Click or tap the arrow icon anywhere it appears in the code to explore additional resources the Society’s ethics committee compiled to help people with day-to-day ethics decisions. Links will open in their own window.

Translations

– Arabic [PDF]
– Chinese [PDF]
– French [PDF]
– German [PDF]
– Persian [PDF]
– Portuguese [PDF]
– Russian [PDF]
– Spanish [PDF]

Additional Applications

– Ethics Case Studies
– Committee Position Papers

SPJ Ethics Committee Publications

– Quill: Stories About Journalism Ethics
– Journalism Ethics: A Casebook of Professional Conduct for News Media, Fourth edition

Additional Resources

– FAQ
– Ethics Hotline
– Contact the Ethics Committee

Get involved

– Become an SPJ Member
– Become an SPJ Supporter

History

– 2014 revision project
– 1996 Ethics Code [PDF]
– 1973 Ethics Code [PDF]
– 1926 Ethics Code [PDF]

Seek Truth and
Report It

Ethical journalism should be accurate and fair. Journalists should be honest and courageous in gathering, reporting and interpreting information.

Journalists should:

– Take responsibility for the accuracy of their work. Verify information before releasing it. Use original sources whenever possible. 

– Remember that neither speed nor format excuses inaccuracy. 

– Provide context. Take special care not to misrepresent or oversimplify in promoting, previewing or summarizing a story. 

– Gather, update and correct information throughout the life of a news story. 

– Be cautious when making promises, but keep the promises they make. 

– Identify sources clearly. The public is entitled to as much information as possible to judge the reliability and motivations of sources. 

– Consider sources’ motives before promising anonymity. Reserve anonymity for sources who may face danger, retribution or other harm, and have information that cannot be obtained elsewhere. Explain why anonymity was granted. 

– Diligently seek subjects of news coverage to allow them to respond to criticism or allegations of wrongdoing. 

– Avoid undercover or other surreptitious methods of gathering information unless traditional, open methods will not yield information vital to the public. 

– Be vigilant and courageous about holding those with power accountable. Give voice to the voiceless. 

– Support the open and civil exchange of views, even views they find repugnant. 

– Recognize a special obligation to serve as watchdogs over public affairs and government. Seek to ensure that the public’s business is conducted in the open, and that public records are open to all. 

– Provide access to source material when it is relevant and appropriate. 

– Boldly tell the story of the diversity and magnitude of the human experience. Seek sources whose voices we seldom hear. 

– Avoid stereotyping. Journalists should examine the ways their values and experiences may shape their reporting. 

– Label advocacy and commentary. 

– Never deliberately distort facts or context, including visual information. Clearly label illustrations and re-enactments. 

– Never plagiarize. Always attribute. 

Minimize Harm

Ethical journalism treats sources, subjects, colleagues and members of the public as human beings deserving of respect.

Journalists should:

– Balance the public’s need for information against potential harm or discomfort. Pursuit of the news is not a license for arrogance or undue intrusiveness. 

– Show compassion for those who may be affected by news coverage. Use heightened sensitivity when dealing with juveniles, victims of sex crimes, and sources or subjects who are inexperienced or unable to give consent. Consider cultural differences in approach and treatment. 

– Recognize that legal access to information differs from an ethical justification to publish or broadcast. 

– Realize that private people have a greater right to control information about themselves than public figures and others who seek power, influence or attention. Weigh the consequences of publishing or broadcasting personal information. 

– Avoid pandering to lurid curiosity, even if others do. 

– Balance a suspect’s right to a fair trial with the public’s right to know. Consider the implications of identifying criminal suspects before they face legal charges. 

– Consider the long-term implications of the extended reach and permanence of publication. Provide updated and more complete information as appropriate. 

Act Independently

The highest and primary obligation of ethical journalism is to serve the public.

Journalists should:

– Avoid conflicts of interest, real or perceived. Disclose unavoidable conflicts. 

– Refuse gifts, favors, fees, free travel and special treatment, and avoid political and other outside activities that may compromise integrity or impartiality, or may damage credibility. 

– Be wary of sources offering information for favors or money; do not pay for access to news. Identify content provided by outside sources, whether paid or not. 

– Deny favored treatment to advertisers, donors or any other special interests, and resist internal and external pressure to influence coverage. 

– Distinguish news from advertising and shun hybrids that blur the lines between the two. Prominently label sponsored content. 

Be Accountable and Transparent

Ethical journalism means taking responsibility for one’s work and explaining one’s decisions to the public.

Journalists should:

– Explain ethical choices and processes to audiences. Encourage a civil dialogue with the public about journalistic practices, coverage and news content. 

– Respond quickly to questions about accuracy, clarity and fairness. 

– Acknowledge mistakes and correct them promptly and prominently. Explain corrections and clarifications carefully and clearly. 

– Expose unethical conduct in journalism, including within their organizations. 

– Abide by the same high standards they expect of others. 

The SPJ Code of Ethics is a statement of abiding principles supported by additional explanations andposition papers that address changing journalistic practices. It is not a set of rules, rather a guide that encourages all who engage in journalism to take responsibility for the information they provide, regardless of medium. The code should be read as a whole; individual principles should not be taken out of context. It is not, nor can it be under the First Amendment, legally enforceable.

Sigma Delta Chi’s first Code of Ethics was borrowed from the American Society of Newspaper Editors in 1926. In 1973, Sigma Delta Chi wrote its own code, which was revised in 1984, 1987, 1996 and 2014.

Copyright © 1996-2018 Society of Professional Journalists. All Rights Reserved.

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Society of Professional Journalists
Eugene S. Pulliam National Journalism Center
3909 N. Meridian St., Suite 200
Indianapolis, IN 46208
317-927-8000

Every session will fall into one of four tracks — Digital, News Management, Newsgathering and Career Development — designed to make you a better journalist.

— Dozens of breakout sessions, all included with your EIJ18 registration
— Reserve your seat for these in-depth, hands-on, skills-based workshops

 

Source: http://excellenceinjournalism.org/

Why Join SPJ?

Make a solid investment in yourself and your profession by joining the Society of Professional Journalists. Membership in SPJ is a rewarding experience that puts you at the forefront of industry happenings.

SPJ has been an industry leader for more than 100 years, and some of its activities may surprise you. Although your rights as a journalist are guaranteed under the First Amendment, the Society of Professional Journalists, both nationally and through local chapters, fights and wins battles for Freedom of Information and First Amendment rights that might not otherwise be fought at all. As a result of SPJ’s grass-roots activism, we are able to address vital issues confronting today’s working journalist.

 

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